Monthly Archives: November 2008

I love my iPhone more than I love you

 

iphone_weightlifter4Today I was multi-tasking, downloading Apple’s new version 2.2 software for my iPhone (google maps street view looks great) on my iMac, while reading my friend and colleague Tony Scida’s blog on my MacBook

 

Tony’s got a great new post about the opportunities that marketers have to create branded iPhone apps and ride Apple’s very long coattails.  He’s got a point.  Apple is hot and now is the perfect time to jump on that bandwagon.  As mobile marketing guru and OTAir honcho Jim Washok likes to point out, iPhones are carried by the “12 million most important people in the world.”  Or at least we iPhone owners like to think so.  Those are exactly the folks who should be carrying your brand in their back pocket.

Coincidentally (great minds think alike), Jim also has a new post on the power of “Appverts,” an application designed to promote a product, service or brand.  He skillfully points out the futility of creating appverts without appvertainment or appvertility value.  

All this eye-phone lovin’ got me thinkin’ about how much I do love that little deck of cards crammed with interactive goodness and who-knows-what.  How did I live my life before I had it?  How did I ever update my facebook and twitter accounts while lifting weights before?  How did I suffer through another “shoot me now” meeting without the diversion of killing tiny little zombies on my screen? How did I ever check live sports scores on the “sly” while chillin’ with my shorty?  I didn’t. And my life sucked.  But not anymore.

Yes, it’s true.  I love my iPhone more than I love you.

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Filed under Daniel Durazo, Mobile Marketing

Top 10 Reasons Circuit City Will Go Out of Business

 

Short-Circuit City

Short-Circuit City

You can file this one under the “kick ’em while they’re down” category.  Sorry.

 

10.  If it ain’t broke, fix it anyway.  During the ’90s, Circuit City was doing great.  The problem was, competition was coming and it was coming hard and nobody took Best Buy seriously.  If you don’t crush the competition, don’t be surprised when they crush you.

9.  In a competitive environment, don’t take your eye off the ball.  DIVX and CarMax were major distractions and Circuit City suffered greatly as a result.

8.  In 2003, Circuit City fired thousands of employees and ended commissions for sales people in favor of an hourly structure.  In 2007, Circuit City fired 3,400 of those hourly workers for cheaper replacements. When you fire well-paid veteran employees to make room for less-experienced, lower paid workers, your customers will notice.  And they won’t like it.

7.  Location, location, location!  B locations equal B customers, B sales, B results.

6.  Don’t notice too late that people want to buy movies, games and music when buying the hardware to play them.  Those low margin items helped create brand loyalty for Best Buy.

5.  Old, outdated stores need to be remodeled or closed and new, bigger ones need to be opened in competitive markets.

4. Selection and availability of hot products is crucial.  If you don’t have what I need, Best Buy, Target or Walmart will.  And next time, I will probably go there first.

3. Give customers a “real” rewards program.  Not just a come-on for a branded credit card.

2. The state of “customer service” in retail America is abysmal.  You can tell very quickly when you walk into a store that the employees couldn’t care less.  Circuit City’s reputation for customer service was far less than stellar.

1.  Filing for bankruptcy 16 days before Black Friday is an extraordinary event that no consumer can ignore. With consumer confidence non-existent and retailers fighting for every sale, you may as well just shut the chain down now.

I am very sorry for all of the employees who have or will lose their jobs in Circuit City’s meltdown.  My thoughts are with you.

UPDATE:  Since I posted this in November, I’ve begun rooting for Circuit City and was hoping it would find a buyer.  The cost of going out of business to its employees, suppliers, etc. is tremendous.  The loss of competition will surely cause competitors (Best Buy) to raise prices and worry less about having a wide variety of items to sell.  Unfortunately, my prediction came true today.  I’m very sorry for those affected.

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Filed under Daniel Durazo, Public Relations